Agressive animals and attacks | AlburyCity
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Agressive animals and attacks

For everyone’s safety and wellbeing, we enforce a range of regulations for dog and cat owners. These include registration, rules about barking dogs, and restrictions on dangerous dogs

Dog aggression

We are all aware of the need to protect our community from the danger and fear of dog attacks. People have a right to feel safe in the community and it is the responsibility of pet owners to ensure the protection of others and to keep public areas safe for people to enjoy.

Pet owners are responsible and legally liable for the actions of their animals.

Bite prevention

Regardless of the size or breed, all dogs can bite if provoked, potentially causing serious injury or death. All dog owners hope their pet won’t show aggression towards other animals or people, but this can and does happen for many reasons.

The reasons for dog attacks are many and varied. From nips to bites to actual attacks, dog bites are a serious problem both in public areas and in our homes.

AlburyCity works hard to try to reduce dog attacks through legislation and public education. Find some useful information below to help you manage your dog's behaviour.

Learn to detect early signs of aggression

Does your dog ever tense up, stare, raise its hackles, growl, lift its lips or snap, when:

  • eating or food is around?
  • its ears, paw, tail or belly is touched?
  • someone goes near its bed or toys?
  • someone tries to move the dog from a comfortable spot?
  • it is told off?
  • someone puts on its collar?
  • someone grabs the dog, or tries to pick it up?
  • it is approached by people, children or other dogs?
  • Does your dog lunge out at people or dogs walking past?
  • Does your dog rush out barking and growling at passers-by?

If the answer is ‘yes' to any of these questions, your dog may be aggressive. These are all early warning signs. Seek professional advice to control your dog's behaviour.

Fence rushing

Many people keep dogs for companionship and protection. However, some dogs can become overly protective of their property, leading to aggressive barking and fence rushing whenever someone approaches or goes past the property. Such behaviour can be frightening to people, especially children, the elderly and the infirm.

It is an offence for a dog to rush at or approach a person in a manner as to cause or give cause for fear or alarm.

Should a complaint be made, Rangers are required to investigate and may issue notices or fines.

Dog attacks

Who is responsible

Dog owners are responsible for their dog’s actions. It is an offence for a dog to attack, harass or chase a person or another animal.

Preventing your dog from attacking

Dogs bite for many reasons. The most common reasons are fear, pain or confusion when mixing with people and other dogs. Ignoring signs of stress and aggression can result in serious injury to you, a member of your family or others.  You can keep your dog happy and safe by:

  • socialising your dog from an early age so that it learns how to mix with other dogs and other people in public.
  • avoiding situations that may cause your dog to become nervous or anxious.
  • training your dog – dog training classes help you learn about your dog, its body language and how you can communicate with it.
  • desex your dog - research shows that desexed animals are less aggressive and less inclined to wander.
  • asking your vet for advice if your dog shows any signs of aggression.

Reporting a dog attack

After a dog attack, you should seek medical or veterinary treatment as a priority.

When it’s safe to do so, report the attack to Council. Phone 6023 8111 or email info@alburycity.nsw.gov.au.

Reporting a dog attack

After a dog attack, you should seek medical or veterinary treatment as a priority.

When it’s safe to do so report the attack by contacting us:

Phone: 02 6023 8111
Email: info@alburycity.nsw.gov.au

Contact Us Online

Dangerous, menacing or restricted dogs

What is a dangerous or menacing dog?

A declared dangerous dog is a dog that an authorised council officer or a local court has declared as dangerous because it:

  • has, without provocation, attacked or killed a person or animal (not including vermin), or
  • has, without provocation, repeatedly threatened to attack or repeatedly chased a person or animal (not including vermin), or
  • is kept or used for hunting (not including a dog used for locating, flushing, pointing or retrieving birds or vermin), or
  • has been declared a dangerous dog under a law of another State or a Territory that corresponds with the Act.

A declared menacing dog is a dog that an authorised council officer or a local court has declared as menacing because it:

  • has displayed unreasonable aggression towards a person or animal (other than vermin), or
  • has, without provocation, attacked a person or animal (other than vermin) but without causing serious injury or death, or
  • has been declared a menacing dog under a law of another State or a Territory that corresponds with the Act.

Many people keep a dog to deter trespassers and burglars. There is no problem with this, providing that it does not become a danger to other people or animals, other than vermin (including displaying unreasonable aggression).

Rules for dangerous or menacing dogs

If you own a dog that has been declared dangerous or menacing, you must ensure that:

  • your dog is microchipped and lifetime registered
  • your dog is desexed (or permanently sterilised)
  • your dog is not, at any time, left in the sole charge of a person under the age of 18 years
  • your dog is contained in an enclosure that meets the requirements of clause 24 of the Companion Animals Regulation 2008 when on the premises where it is ordinarily kept. You must also obtain a certificate of compliance from your local council, certifying that the enclosure meets the regulatory requirements
  • you prominently display dangerous dog warning signs on the premises where your dog is ordinarily kept
  • your dog wears a prescribed collar at all times
  • your dog wears a muzzle and is securely leashed at all times when outside the enclosure where it is ordinarily kept. If your dog has been declared as a dangerous dog because it is being kept or used for hunting, it is exempt from the requirements to be muzzled and securely leashed when outside the enclosure where ordinarily kept when it is actually hunting
  • you do not transfer ownership of your dog. It is also an offence to accept ownership of a dangerous dog
  • you do not sell (sell includes give away) your dog or advertise it for sale.

Declared dangerous or menacing dogs that come to the Albury Animal Management Facility will be humanely put down.

What is a restricted dog?

Restricted dog breeds and categories in NSW are:

  • American pitbull terrier or pitbull terrier
  • Japanese tosa
  • dogo Argentino (Argentinean fighting dog)
  • fila Brasiliero (Brazilian fighting dog)
  • any other dog breed, kind or description that the Customs Act 1901 prohibits from importing into Australia  any dog declared by an authorised council officer to be a restricted dog under the Companion Animals Act 1998

If you own a restricted dog and it attacks or injures a person or an animal (other than vermin) without being provoked, you must report it to your local council within 24 hours of the attack or injury.

Rules for restricted dogs

If you are the owner of a restricted dog, you must ensure that:

  • your dog is microchipped and lifetime registered
  • your dog is desexed (or permanently sterilised)
  • your dog is contained in an enclosure that complies with the requirements of clause 24 of the Companion Animals Regulation 2008 when on the premises where normally kept (you must also obtain a certificate of compliance from your local council, certifying that the enclosure meets the regulatory requirements)
  • your dog wears a muzzle and is securely leashed at all times when outside the enclosure
  • your dog wears a prescribed collar at all times
  • you prominently display dangerous dog warning signs on the premises where your dog is normally kept
  • your dog is not left at any time in the sole charge of a person under 18 years of age
  • you do not breed from, or advertise as available for breeding, your dog prior to desexing
  • you do not transfer ownership of your dog. It is also an offence for someone to accept ownership of a restricted dog
  • you do not sell (sell includes giving away) your dog or advertise it for sale.

If you fail to comply with these requirements, you may be liable for large fines or imprisonment and your dog may be seized and destroyed

Restricted dogs that come to the Albury Animal Management Facility will be humanely put down

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